Natural Communities of NH -- Photo Guide

Twisted sedge low riverbank  (S3S4)



Twisted sedge low riverbanks
appear at the base of some high-energy riverbanks, at the edge of the actual river channel. It is usually a narrow community. Twisted sedge is always present and forms large tussocks, with other species sometimes present in low abundance.

Characteristic Vegetation: Twisted sedge (Carex torta) is the dominant species. Species that may be present in low abundance include bluejoint (Calamagrostis canadensis), hemp dogbane (Apocynum cannabinum), grass-leaved goldenrod (Euthamia graminifolia), swamp candles (Lysimachia terrestris), spotted Joe-pye-weed (Eupatorium maculatum), meadowsweet (Spiraea alba), sensitive fern (Onoclea sensibilis), reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea), panic grasses (Panicum spp.), brambles (Rubus spp.), violets (Viola spp.), and red maple (Acer rubrum) seedlings.


Good examples of this community occur at Livermore Falls (Holderness) and along the Dead Diamond River (Second College Grant).

Twisted sedge low riverbanks usually occur as part of larger moderate-gradient sandy-cobbly riverbank systems or low-gradient silty-sandy riverbank systems.


Twisted sedge low riverbank on the Swift River near the Kancamagus Highway (photo by Ben Kimball for the NH Natural Heritage Bureau)
Twisted sedge low riverbank on the Swift River near the Kancamagus Highway
(photo by Ben Kimball)


(uncommonly wide example of a) twisted sedge low riverbank at Sumners Falls on the CT River (photo by Ben Kimball for the NH Natural Heritage Bureau) 
Twisted sedge low riverbank at Sumners Falls on the Connecticut River
(photo by Ben Kimball)

Twisted sedge low riverbank along the Peabody River near Gorham (photo by Ben Kimball for the NH Natural Heritage Bureau)
Twisted sedge low riverbank along the Peabody River near Gorham (photo by Ben Kimball)
 

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