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CAROLINE A. FOX RESEARCH AND DEMONSTRATION FOREST

The Caroline A. Fox Research and Demonstration Forest (Fox Forest) has been the State of New Hampshire’s forest research station since 1933. The forest is a gift to New Hampshire from Miss Caroline Fox of Arlington, Massachusetts. Miss Fox spent her summers on the property and had an interest in forest management issues. Before her death, Miss Fox also donated to the State a trust fund to finance activities on the property. Since then the Fox Forest Trust has provided regular funds to demonstrate proper scientific forestry, provide areas for applied forest research, provide programs on natural resource management, and develop a forest and property for public access and use.

Presently the forest contains 1,445 acres, the Henry I. Baldwin Forestry Education Center and a farm house/office. Fox Forest Research Research has been focused in two directions, (1) international forest genetics experiments (provenance trials) and (2) applied research focused on local forest management issues. Dr. Henry Ives Baldwin was the first research forester at Fox Forest and he established many of the present day exotic and native tree plantations. He also directed the applied forest management activities including silvicultural and forest products research.

Since then, research topics have included growth studies, planting studies, forest recovery after the 1938 hurricane, pre-commercial thinning studies, charcoal making, herbicide research and investigations of unique forest areas. Fox Forest research presently includes an assessment of timber harvesting in New Hampshire, forest sampling studies, regeneration research for white pine and red oak, uneven-aged management research and growth and yield studies.


                                       Where We Are 


2015 Cottrell-Baldwin Environmental Lecture Series:

Like a Pebble In A Pond:  Ripples of Land Use Changes Over Time

Caroline A. Fox Research & Demonstration Forest, 309 Center Rd, Hillsborough,
All programs take place on Tuesday evenings in March from 7 to 8:30 pm in the Baldwin Center

The histories of farming, forests, wildlife and people are entwined in the northeast. The impact of
land use change will continue to ripple through the future of our farms, forests, wildlife and
people who depend upon them.  This winter, our annual lecture series examines landscape history and
land use change – by both looking back and considering what may lie ahead.

March 3rd “Forests for the People” What’s Next for America’s Eastern National Forests? David  Govatski, US Forest Service (Ret)  Co-author of the book “Forests for the People”, David will present a slide-illustrated talk examining the vital ecological, social and economic issues facing
America’s eastern national forests today and in the future. Case studies include shale oil
extraction, restoration ecology, invasive insects, burgeoning recreation and calls for preservation
vs. multiple use management.

March 17th  Movie Night: “The People’s Forest”
The film “The People’s Forest” is the result of a 2-year collaboration between acclaimed film-maker
David Huntley, the Center for Rural Partnerships at Plymouth State University and the Museum of the
White Mountains. It is a visual treasury of rarely seen vintage still photos and juttering horse-
drawn cinema as well as Huntley’s own breathtaking shots of the White Mountain National Forest
today. Film-maker David Huntley will show the film and discuss its impact in NH and elsewhere.

March 24th Boom to Bust and Back Again: Is Past A Prologue for NH Agriculture? Stephen Taylor, former Commissioner of Agriculture, is well known as a speaker who is both informative and entertaining. With decades experience as proprietor of a working dairy farm and maple operation in the village of Meriden in Plainfield, Taylor speaks with authority to the rise and fall of the great sheep boom, hill farm culture, the influence of the NH Grange, family dairy farms and 4H. The advent of new niche markets, local foods and farmers markets and unique new specialty “boutique farms” and soaring interest in backyard poultry, sheep and goats, llamas and alpacas – is creating a renaissance for farming in NH. What will markets, climates and public interest add to the red hot trends in our growing agricultural sectors?

March 31st Oh to Be Young Again: An Aging Forest Means Trouble for Some NH Wildlife
Jim Oehler, State Lands Habitat Biologist, New Hampshire Fish and Game Dept.
The landscape of northeastern and north central states has changed. One big difference is the
amount of land now covered with houses, roads, and other development. Another, more-subtle
transition has also taken place: We have more mature forest today than we did 50 years ago. Many
wildlife species do not live in mature woods. Populations including wood turtle, indigo bunting,
New England cottontail, and bobcat have declined. No fewer than 65 reptiles, birds, and mammals – all of which need young forest – have been designated species of greatest conservation need in the
Northeast. Learn how the partners in the Young Forest Project are working to change this trend.

The Cottrell-Baldwin Lecture Series is co-sponsored by the NH Division of Forests & Lands and the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire’s Forests. For more info call 224-9945.

 


ALERT:  TRAIL CLOSURES

THE BOG 4-CORNERS PARKING LOT & MUD POND ROAD FROM GOULD POND ROAD TO RIDGE TRAIL WILL BE CLOSED FOR REPAIRS ON FRIDAY OCT. 3, 2014. PLEASE PLAN ACCORDINGLY.

THE RABBIT TRAIL IS CLOSED INDEFINITELY DUE TO FLOODING.  


If you have any questions, please contact Fox Forest
by phone (603-464-3453) or email (
foxforest@dred.state.nh.us).