NHB Data Requests

 

NH Natural Heritage (NHB) maintains a database of known locations of rare species and exemplary natural communities. There are two ways to request a check of the NHB database.

 

1. Information About Rare Species for a Permit or Grant Requirement

Federal, state, and local agencies may require a check of the Natural Heritage database to determine whether a proposed project could impact rare species or critical habitat. In some circumstances, a $25 fee will be assessed to cover staff time.

To request a check of the Natural Heritage database, permit applicants can use the DataCheck Tool. This is an interactive web page that can be used to provide NHB with basic information about a project, including a map.

If there are no NHB records anywhere in the vicinity, a letter to that effect will be e-mailed at once, automatically, and there is no fee. If NHB records are in the vicinity, a review by NHB is needed. This review can be requested using the DataCheck Tool. If the $25 fee is required it must be paid by check or money order.

First Time Users: Please print instructions for mapping your project using the Tool.
 
If permit applicants do not wish to use the DataCheck tool, they may submit a request form to NHB by e-mail or mail.

Wetlands Minimum Impact Forestry Notification (pdf version) (MS Word version)

All other permit and grant applications (pdf version) (MS Word version

 

2. Landowner Requests (including forest management plans) 

NH Natural Heritage can check its database to see if we have any rare plant, rare animal, or exemplary natural community records on your property. Please fill out the landowner request form to request such a check. There is no fee for this service. However, the results cannot be used for permit requirements (the scope of the database check is different). See above to request information for a permit requirement.

Landowner request form (pdf version) (MS Word version)

Please note that very little of New Hampshire has been inventoried for biodiversity, so even if something is on your property, it has probably not been recorded. A field survey would provide better information on what species and communities are indeed present. NH Heritage is sometimes able to do property-specific inventories for towns or individuals, but only after we have worked out a formal contract to cover our expenses.